Topic: Supply Chain


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There’s No Best Age to Start a Business: The Story of Sam Walton and Wal-Mart

Walton

Photo by tsweden

After graduating from the University of Missouri in 1940, Sam Walton took a job with J.C. Penney.  He was 22 years old.  He spent five years with J.C. Penney learning the retail industry.  In 1945, Walton became an entrepreneur and bought a Ben Franklin variety store in Arkansas for $25,000.  He was 27 years old.  Walton spent five years growing his Ben Franklin store.  But in 1950, after Walton’s landlord refused to renew the five year lease he had on the Ben Franklin store location, Walton had no choice but to sell the franchise.  He sold it for a fair price, and then had to start all over again.  Walton was now 32, and it was at this age when he opened his first Walton’s Five and Dime (again in Arkansas).  But it wasn’t until he was 44 years old that he opened the first Wal-Mart.  It was a very gradual progression.  So, does age really matter when starting a business?  I doubt it.  There is no best age to start a business, no perfect time – none of that.  And Sam Walton is the perfect example of this.  Read More »

How to Build an Empire: The Story of Harvey Firestone and His Tires

Firestone Tire

Photo by Desert Bug

In 1926, Harvey Firestone sat down to write Men and Rubber: The Story of Business.  It outlines his philosophy on how to succeed in business, and to this day it’s still the best and most comprehensive story on how to build a business from nothing.

Firestone’s philosophy is quite simple.  It says that honesty is the fundamental principle of any business.  It says that a business must exist for a reason, and the single reason for the existence of any business must be that it supplies a human need or want.  “To make money” is not a good enough reason to be in business.  If fact, if all you want is money, Firestone advises you to get out of business as quickly as you can, and go work for someone else.  You are destined to fail otherwise.

Firestone was clear that a business must exist to supply a human need or want, and this philosophy can be further explained through Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.  The primary need for all humans is physiological, followed by safety, love/belonging, esteem, and self-actualization.  Humans seek to satisfy needs in this order.  Firestone was supplying tires, or facilitating transportation.  Transportation, depending on its intended use, could fall under physiological needs (driving to the grocery store for food), safety needs (driving to the office for work), or love/belonging needs (driving to family).  Either way, Firestone was clearly satisfying human needs with his tires.

This logic applies today as well.  For example, Mark Zuckerberg’s reason for starting Facebook (“to meet girls”), while it hurts my heart, does provide for the love/belonging needs that all humans naturally have.

That’s the end of my Zuckerberg digression – now back to Firestone…   Read More »

An Accelerated Master’s Degree: Supply Chain Management in One Book

BP 8

Photo by Stuck in Customs

There have been plenty of books recently published on the concept of Deliberate Practice, which essentially says that it takes 10,000 hours of a certain kind of practice (called ‘deliberate’) to gain expertise in something.   It makes sense that the majority of what you want to learn in any discipline is going to be experiential (or gained through practice).  But in order to better understand your experiences, you want to have some kind of framework of what to expect.  You want to develop a theory structure.

Books are what give you this theory structure, and certainly the quality of the theory structure you begin with impacts the amount of deliberate practice you need to become an ‘expert.’  So it’s important to choose the right books, as they will provide the base infrastructure upon which you will layer your experiences.  You’re looking for books that concisely capture the overriding concepts of a particular discipline.

And in any discipline, at least one fairly well defined, there doesn’t need to be that many books to accomplish this.  I would generally say that 3 books or fewer, for each discipline, will give you a proper theory structure.

With that in mind, let’s look at Supply Chain Management…  Read More »

But What If It Isn’t Cool?: The Story of Eric Ries and IMVU

IMVU

Photo by pixelsebi

Eric Ries, with a few others, started a company called IMVU in 2004.  As in IM (Instant Message) VU (view) – the novelty of the concept was the introduction of avatars to instant messaging.  He tells his story through the following five core principles of the Lean Startup Movement:

  1. Entrepreneurs are everywhere: in other words, the constraints to being an entrepreneur are minimal, if they exist at all.
  2. Entrepreneurship is management: or, a start-up requires a different set of management principles than a mature company does.
  3. Validated learning: One of Ries’ core concepts, basically stating that start-ups exist to learn how to build a sustainable business
  4. Build-Measure-Learn: a critical feedback loop that Ries developed – he advocates that all successful start-up processes should be geared to accelerate this feedback loop
  5. Innovation accounting: traditional accounting doesn’t properly measure what matters to him (and on this, I wholly agree with him), so he set up a different process to measure progress, set up milestones, and prioritize work.

Eric and his colleagues eventually grew IMVU to annual revenues of more than $50 million in 2011 (and some level of profitability, which he doesn’t disclose).  It’s important to note, however, that Ries is in no way shy about admitting the repeated mistakes that he and his team made at the outset.  You can read all about his adventure in The Lean Startup.  One of the more amusing issues was the unwillingness of test users to tell their friends about it.  After all, it was new to them, and they weren’t quite sure whether or not it was cool.  And as well all know, it’s totes obvi that you gotta protect your rep.

Of course, there is another way to look at what Eric did to create his organization.  Eric’s success can also be deciphered through mental models…   Read More »