Mental Model Posts ‘Checklisting’

Three Mental Models Great Managers Use

Shangri-La

Photo by Dhilung Kirat

Organizations, left unattended, move toward disorder.  The realities of Parkinson’s Law – the idea that work expands to fill the amount of time allocated to complete it – have been well documented.  So, Parkinson’s Law helps to explain why organizations naturally evolve towards disorder, and ultimately poor performance.  Managers, of course, act to correct this.  An array of mental models assist managers in working against this natural disorder, but there are three primary mental models that produce the majority of the results:  Read More »

An Accelerated Master’s Degree: Manufacturing in One Book

Create

Photo by Stuck in Customs

There have been plenty of books recently published on the concept of Deliberate Practice, which essentially says that it takes 10,000 hours of a certain kind of practice (called ‘deliberate’) to gain expertise in something.   It makes sense that the majority of what you want to learn in any discipline is going to be experiential (or gained through practice).  But in order to better understand your experiences, you want to have some kind of framework of what to expect.  You want to develop a Theory Structure.

Books are what give you this theory structure, and certainly the quality of the theory structure you begin with impacts the amount of deliberate practice you need to become an ‘expert.’  So it’s important to choose the right books, as they will provide the base infrastructure upon which you will layer your experiences.  You’re looking for books that concisely capture the overriding concepts of a particular discipline.

And in any discipline, at least one fairly well defined, there doesn’t need to be that many books to accomplish this.  I would generally say that 3 books or fewer, for each discipline, will give you a proper theory structure.

With that in mind, let’s look at Manufacturing (or really, Production)…  Read More »

The $240 MBA: How to Be Better at What Matters

@ Sprengben

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The most important skills (or really, the most valuable) are the ones that are the hardest to codify.  I think this is probably true throughout life, but it’s especially true in business.  And in business, the single most important skill is decision-making.  It won’t guarantee success, but it will certainly increase the odds.  And since we’re all constantly having to make decisions without complete information, it’s understandable to think of decision-making as an art.  But, decision-making is likely as much science as it is art.  And in fact, understanding the science of decision-making is more valuable in the business landscape than all the knowledge you would gain from an MBA combined.  And you can become a pretty good decision-maker in way less than the 18-22 months that an MBA typically takes to complete.  You can also do it for WAY less money: $240 according to my latest review of Amazon. Read More »