Mental Model Posts ‘Competitive Destruction’

An Accelerated Master’s Degree: Innovation in One Book

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Topics: Innovation
Innovation

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There have been plenty of books recently published on the concept of Deliberate Practice, which essentially says that it takes 10,000 hours of a certain kind of practice (called ‘deliberate’) to gain expertise in something.   It makes sense that the majority of what we want to learn in any discipline is going to be experiential (or gained through practice).  But in order to better understand our experiences, we want to have some kind of framework of what to expect.  We want to develop a theory structure.

Books are what give us this theory structure, and certainly the quality of the theory structure we begin with impacts the amount of deliberate practice we need to become an ‘expert.’  So it’s important to choose the right books, as they will provide the base infrastructure upon which we will layer our experiences.  We’re looking for books that concisely capture the overriding concepts of a particular discipline.

And in any discipline, at least one fairly well defined, there doesn’t need to be that many books to accomplish this.  I would generally say that 3 books or fewer, for each discipline, will give you a proper theory structure.

With that in mind, let’s look at Innovation…  Read More »

How to Avoid a Bad Business: The Ravages of Commoditization

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Certain aspects of business can behave in fairly predictable ways.  One of the ways, which is more painful than funny, is the tendency of products or services to become commodities over time.  When this happens, it’s often five mental models that come together and drive everything towards commoditization.

First of all, Zipf’s Law (R.I.P. George Zipf) has been repeatedly observed in many different environments.  Zipf noticed that the most common word in the English language appeared 10 times more often than the tenth most common word.  He noticed it in other languages as well – he got excited.  What he really noticed was the phenomenon we now call “winner takes all.”  So in any market, this is at work.  Get to number one – it’s just better that way.  Read More »