Mental Model Posts ‘Creative Destruction’

But What If It Isn’t Cool?: The Story of Eric Ries and IMVU

IMVU

Photo by pixelsebi

Eric Ries, with a few others, started a company called IMVU in 2004.  As in IM (Instant Message) VU (view) – the novelty of the concept was the introduction of avatars to instant messaging.  He tells his story through the following five core principles of the Lean Startup Movement:

  1. Entrepreneurs are everywhere: in other words, the constraints to being an entrepreneur are minimal, if they exist at all.
  2. Entrepreneurship is management: or, a start-up requires a different set of management principles than a mature company does.
  3. Validated learning: One of Ries’ core concepts, basically stating that start-ups exist to learn how to build a sustainable business
  4. Build-Measure-Learn: a critical feedback loop that Ries developed – he advocates that all successful start-up processes should be geared to accelerate this feedback loop
  5. Innovation accounting: traditional accounting doesn’t properly measure what matters to him (and on this, I wholly agree with him), so he set up a different process to measure progress, set up milestones, and prioritize work.

Eric and his colleagues eventually grew IMVU to annual revenues of more than $50 million in 2011 (and some level of profitability, which he doesn’t disclose).  It’s important to note, however, that Ries is in no way shy about admitting the repeated mistakes that he and his team made at the outset.  You can read all about his adventure in The Lean Startup.  One of the more amusing issues was the unwillingness of test users to tell their friends about it.  After all, it was new to them, and they weren’t quite sure whether or not it was cool.  And as well all know, it’s totes obvi that you gotta protect your rep.

Of course, there is another way to look at what Eric did to create his organization.  Eric’s success can also be deciphered through mental models…   Read More »